Carey "Elmo" Wells, shown with bloodhound officer Ruby, is retiring after 35 years in law enforcement in Greenwood. He worked with Greenwood Police Department and Greenwood County Sheriff's Office.
(Chris Trainor | Index-Journal)
Carey "Elmo" Wells, shown with bloodhound officer Ruby, is retiring after 35 years in law enforcement in Greenwood. He worked with Greenwood Police Department and Greenwood County Sheriff's Office. (Chris Trainor | Index-Journal)
Some people just seem born for a certain career path.
That is certainly the case for Carey “Elmo” Wells, the well-known officer who just wrapped up a 35-year career in law enforcement in Greenwood County.
Wells, 56, worked with the Greenwood Police Department from 1978-96. After leaving GPD, he went to work with the Greenwood County Sheriff’s Office, where he remained from 1996 until his retirement a couple of weeks ago.
A Ninety Six native, Wells said he spent some of his youth dreaming of one day being a veterinarian. However, as he grew up, his focus and passion shifted to law enforcement.


However, it should be noted Wells’ love of animals carried into his police career in a major way, as he later spent many years working with the Greenwood County Sheriff’s Office bloodhound tracking team. He was known for the special bond he shared with several of GCSO’s canine officers, including Ruby and the late Lil’ Man.
Wells said he thoroughly enjoyed his career as a police officer. He admitted he is going to miss it, especially the opportunities he had to assist people with various matters when they were in need.
“I really enjoy helping people,” Wells said. “I went to the courthouse several weeks ago and let some folks know that I was retiring. We were talking about things that I have done. (Deputy) Greg Allison said ‘There wasn’t a day that went by that someone didn’t call Elmo wanting him to help them.’  I would try to help them, whether it be with a speeding ticket or with some kind of domestic situation or whether it was a civil matter or whatever.
“I’d like to think that, if I had contact with 100 people, I was able to help at least 90 of them.”

FOR MORE OF THE STORY READ THE INDEX JOURNAL